Earthquake in Nepal!

We just had a large earthquake in Nepal! The moment tensor shows that this is a thrust/reverse (originally it was solved as a strike slip) earthquake. I will need to do a little more investigating about this tomorrow. (I am running short on sleep and have an early flight in the morning). Here is the USGS website for this Mw 7.9 earthquake. This is still plotting as a shallow earthquake. Originally it was listed as a 7.5. This is a large earthquake, shallow, and compressional. There will possibly be many injured and many casualties from this earthquake. :-(

Here is the map that I quickly put together. I have placed the moment tensor on the map. I have posted various tutorials about moment tensors on other earthquake posts, so will leave that out on this map.

This map shows the MMI contours with MMI VIII in nearest the epicenter.

Here is the USGS intensity map. The map uses the Modified Mercalli Intensity scale, which is largely based upon the qualitative observations by people just like you and me. The map below is generated using a numerical model to estimate the amount of ground motions from an earthquake given some assumptions about the crust nearby the earthquake (or, rather, the crust for the earthquakes used in the empirical relations used to create the model). These estimates are not direct observations, so the “Did You Feel It” map is better for people to learn about what the real ground motions, or shaking intensity, was for this earthquake.

Here is the current DYFI map, which should be updated over the next day as more people submit their observations to the web site.

This is a measure of how well the model used to create the intensity map above matches the DYFI map.

Category(s): asia, Chemeketa Community College, education, geology, HSU, plate tectonics

10 Responses to Earthquake in Nepal!

13 Responses in other blogs/articles

  1. […] of the 1505 earthquake, that some consider the most devastating known earthquake in the region. Here is the post I made early this morning. After class (running late), I will post more material on the historic […]

  2. […] region that slipped in 1833 and the western portion of hte region that slipped in 1934. Here is my original page for this earthquake. Here is an post that I updated later in the […]

  3. […] and include a figure from a recent presentation given by Roger Bilham at AGU (2011). Here was my original and first updated posts about this earthquake and here is my first compilation […]

  4. […] of the 1505 earthquake, that some consider the most devastating known earthquake in the region. Here is the post I made early this morning. After class (running late), I will post more material on the historic […]

  5. […] region that slipped in 1833 and the western portion of the region that slipped in 1934. Here is my original page for this earthquake. Here is an post that I updated later in the […]

  6. […] and include a figure from a recent presentation given by Roger Bilham at AGU (2011). Here was my original and first updated posts about this earthquake and here is my first compilation […]

  7. […] Original Earthquake Post 2015.04.24 […]

  8. […] Original Earthquake Post 2015.04.24 […]

  9. […] 7.8 Mainshock Initial Post: original post and links to […]

  10. […] 7.8 Mainshock Initial Post: original post and links to […]

  11. […] 7.8 Mainshock Initial Post: original post and links to […]

  12. […] 2015.04.25 Nepal […]

  13. […] Report: http://earthjay.com/?p=2357 Comparison with historic EQs http://earthjay.com/?p=2361 USGS Intensity Reports […]

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